Puppy Mix recipe from Northside member only has 6 ingredients

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Thanks to Colene Ledford, we have a recipe for Brunswick Stew, and it is shared with us by New Vision Community Church’s Feeding the Flock. It makes a lot of food, enough for a really big family! It uses two pounds each of ground beef, chicken, and Boston butt plus five pounds of potatoes.

We have Cauliflower with Mushroom Cheese Sauce which looks to be delicious. This is one of the recipes from Savannah Style, the book we enjoy so much because of its unique ways to prepare foods.

From Charleston Receipts, we have Mrs. Izard’s Baked Hominy. Hominy is the big kernels of field corn, both white and yellow, which are then ground for our familiar morning grits or tortil-las. You will see canned hominy in the grocery store which is the only way I have ever used it. Bake it in moderate oven until done.

Sugar’s Gingerbread is one that Mrs. O. A. Williams declares, “It is an old recipe and good!” This comes from our friends in Plains, Georgia, in their Plains Pot Pourri.

Puppy Mix from Lillian Cleghorn and Northside Baptist Church is not for the puppy! It is for you and the kids, be you eight or eighty! This is great for this time of year when you want to put out something tasty and fun for all ages.

     From The New York Times NEW Natural Foods Cookbook, by Jean Hewitt, we have recipes for Homemade Chicken Broth, Turkey Broth, and Vegetable Broth. Making your own broth will surely save you some hard-earned money; not only that, you know what is in it! It won’t be full of preservatives and other chemicals. And, it is the base for the most delicious soups you will ever serve. I even make it from store-bought rotisseried chicken. I save my broth in the freezer and have it on hand when I need it. If your broth has grease on top, let it cool, then skim it off before you put it up.

COLENE LEDFORD’S BRUNSWICK STEW, SOUTHERN STYLE

Recipe from

New Vision Community Church’s Feeding the Flock

2 pounds ground beef

(chuck or round)

1 40-ounce bottle ketchup

2 large onions, sliced

2 pounds chicken, cooked and cut up

2 pounds Boston butt pork, cooked and cut up

1 gallon garden peas

1 gallon whole kernel corn

5 pounds Irish potatoes, cubed and cooked

Salt to taste

Pepper to taste

3 ounces Louisiana hot sauce

Using a 16-quart pot, brown the ground beef. Add onion and cook to transparency. Drain off fat. Add a pint of water and ketchup. Fill ketchup bottle with water, shake, and add to mixture.

Add chicken, pork, peas and corn. Bring this mixture to a boil. Lower temperature to low and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add more water if needed.

Add the cooked potatoes, salt and pepper. Mix well and return to a boil. Lower heat to simmer. Add hot sauce and simmer for 10 minutes with the lid on pot.

Remove from heat and wait for at least 10 minutes. Serve with saltine crackers.

Hot sauce may be added at the table for those who like their stew more spicy.

CAULIFLOWER WITH MUSHROOM CHEESE SAUCE

Recipe from Savannah Style, a Cookbook by The Junior League of Savannah, Inc.

1 medium head cauliflower

1-1/2 cups mushrooms, sliced

2 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons flour

1/4 teaspoon salt

Dash white pepper

1 cup milk

1 cup sharp cheese, grated

1 teaspoon prepared mustard

1 tablespoon parsley, snipped

Steam whole head of cauliflower in basket for 15 minutes until crisp-tender. Cook fresh mushrooms in butter until tender (about 4 minutes). Blend flour, salt and white pepper into but-ter. Add milk; cook, stirring constantly until thickened. Stir in cheese and mustard. Heat until cheese melts. Place cauliflower on platter; spoon sauce over and serve remaining sauce. Sprin-kle with parsley.

MRS. RALPH IZARD’S (MISS EMMA WITSELL) BAKED HOMINY

Recipe from Charleston Receipts, America’s Oldest Junior League Cookbook in Print,

a Cookbook by The Junior League of Charleston, Inc.

1-1/2 cups hominy, cooked

1 heaping tablespoon butter

3 eggs

1-1/2 cups milk

3/4 cup corn meal

1/2 teaspoon salt

While hominy is still hot, add butter and eggs beaten very light. Then gradually add milk and when well mixed, add corn meal and salt. The batter should be like thick custard. Pour in deep greased pan and bake in moderate oven (375 degrees) until done. Serves 6 to 8.

MRS. O. A. WILLIAMS’ SUGAR’S GINGERBREAD

Recipe from Food Favorites of Plains, Georgia Plains Pot Pourri

1/2 cup shortening

1/2 cup sugar

1 egg

1 cup cane syrup (be sure to use cane syrup and not Karo syrup, which is corn syrup.)

1 cup hot water

2-1/2 cups sifted flour

1-1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 teaspoon ginger

1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

Cream sugar and shortening. Add egg, cane syrup, and hot water and mix. Combine dry ingredients. Mix together and pour into large greased and floured pan (9-inch x 13-inch).

Bake at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. This is an old recipe and good.

LILLIAN CLEGHORN’S PUPPY MIX

Recipe from Northside Baptist Church cookbook

1 stick butter

1 cup chocolate chips

1 cup peanut butter

1 box Crispix Cereal

1 cup powdered sugar

1 jar (14-16 ounce) roasted peanuts

Melt butter, chocolate chips, and peanut butter. Pour mixture over Crispix Cereal and mix to coat. Let cool approx. 15 minutes or longer. Pour powdered sugar over mixture and add pea-nuts, stir and serve. Fun to make and delightful to eat.

HOMEMADE CHICKEN BROTH

THE NEW YORK TIMES NEW

NATURAL FOODS COOKBOOK

Copyright 1982 by Jean Hewitt

1-1/2 quarts boiling water, backs, wings, and necks of 2 or 3 chickens

1 onion, quartered

1 carrot, quartered

2 celery stalks with leaves, diced

1 teaspoon salt

4 peppercorns

2 bay leaves

2 sprigs parsley

To the boiling water in a large saucepan, add the remaining ingredients, cover, and simmer for 2 hours. Strain. Concentrate by boiling, if necessary, for a richer flavor. Cool, chill, and freeze. Yield: About one quart.

HOMEMADE TURKEY BROTH

THE NEW YORK TIMES NEW

NATURAL FOODS COOKBOOK

Copyright 1982 by Jean Hewitt

Carcass from 10- to 16-pound turkey, broken up

2 to 3 quarts water

1 large onion, quartered

2 celery stalks, quartered

1 carrot, quartered

1 tablespoon salt

8 black peppercorns, crushed in a mortar and pestle

1 bay leaf, crumbled

1 teaspoon dried thyme

Put all the ingredients in a large heavy pot, bring to a boil, cover, and simmer for 2 hours. Strain the broth and use in soups, stews or gravies. Remove any turkey meat from the bones and add to the broth or use in casseroles. Cool, chill, and freeze in pints or quarts. Yield: About two quarts.

HOMEMADE VEGETABLE BROTH

THE NEW YORK TIMES NEW

NATURAL FOODS COOKBOOK

Copyright 1982 by Jean Hewitt

1/2 cup vegetable oil

4 carrots, diced

4 celery stalks with leaves, diced

3 large onions, chopped

6 medium-sized potatoes, diced

3 turnips, diced

3 cups parings from scrubbed

carrots, potatoes, turnips, parsnips, if available

3 quarts water

2 bay leaves, crumbled