Grill up Eloise Surrette’s Steaks on Sticks for Mother’s Day

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Steaks on Sticks recipe

From Apopka Citizen Police Alumni Association’s Sharing Our Finest Cookbook, Eloise Surrette’s Steaks on Sticks is deliciously grilled by dad and the kids for Mother’s Day!

Whenever we want pulled pork, I think of this recipe from Margaret Biddle, one of our readers. It is very simple. Just put the Boston butt in the crockpot overnight and finish it up the next morning. It is sooo yummy!

Dry rubbed ribs from Palmetto Creek Farms comes from the book titled From Field to Feast. It is simple to prepare and absolutely delicious.

Mrs. Bob Meyers shares her recipe for Barbecue Sauce with us through Treasures and Pleasures, from First Presbyterian Church of Apopka.

From Field to Feast, we have Southern Fried Corn. John Alger and his wife Carla fix this recipe from corn picked “right out here in the field.” The farm is located south of Miami in Homestead where they produce sweet corn on 1100 acres, making Alger Farms a major provider of sweet corn in America’s “winter bread basket.” They operate their farm as a business and are great supporters of agricultural research and industry-wide interests. They caution, “Once you toss the corn in the skillet, it begins to caramelize – be careful not to overcook or the corn will toughen.”

Broccoli and Cauliflower Salad from New Vision’s Feeding the Flock is shared by our dear friend for so many years, Neoma Knox. It is wonderfully crisp, sweet, and tangy. Delicious!

Nancy Thomas, a long-time reader, shares her cole slaw. She puts crushed salted peanuts in the slaw. She says she learned this trick from her dad, a good ole’ Georgia boy.

ELOISE SURRETTE’S

STEAKS ON STICKS (Grill)

Recipe from Apopka Citizen Police Alumni Association,

Sharing Our Finest Cookbook

3-1/2 pounds boneless steak, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 clove garlic, cut

2 tablespoons olive oil

20 small white onions

salt and pepper to taste

Rub steak cubes with garlic and brush with olive oil. Arrange cubes on green wooden sticks or skewers, alternating each with an onion. Grill over hot bed of charcoal. Brush, if desired, with your favorite barbecue sauce.

MARGARET BIDDLE’S

CROCKPOT PULLED PORK

Contributed by Reader of

The Apopka Chief

1 fresh Boston butt (about 4-5 pounds)

4 medium onions chopped

1 cup chili sauce

1/2 cup BBQ sauce of your choice

4 tablespoons Worcestershire

1 cup tomato sauce

4 tablespoons Tabasco (or less)

3 tablespoons brown sugar

1/2 cup apple cider vinegar

Juice from two lemons

1/2 teaspoon dry mustard

2 teaspoons salt

2 teaspoons black pepper

Trim Boston butt of excess fat and put in crockpot overnight on high. Meat will be falling from the bone and swimming in juice. Remove some of juice from meat and put aside for use later if needed; otherwise it may be too soupy. Shred meat and add other ingredients. Let simmer another 2 hours. Serve on hamburger buns.

PALMETTO CREEK FARMS,

AVON PARK, DRY-RUBBED

BABY BACK RIBS

Recipe from Field to Feast

1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar

1/4 cup paprika

1/4 cup Ancho chili powder (dark Mexican chili powder)

4 teaspoons coarse salt

4 teaspoons smoked paprika

4 teaspoons cumin

4 teaspoons cayenne

4 (2-pound) slabs loin back ribs, membrane removed (ask your butcher to do this for you)

For the rub:

Mix brown sugar, paprika, ancho chili powder, salt, smoked paprika, cumin, and cayenne in a small bowl, making sure to break up chunks of brown sugar.

Put ribs bone side up on sheet pan. Season each slab with rub on both sides. Refrigerate at least 1 hour, loosely covered.

Heat oven to 250 degrees Fahrenheit. Cut four (12- by 12-inch) square sheets of heavy-duty aluminum foil. Put a slab of ribs, meat side up, on a sheet of foil. Fold ends to make loose packet around each slab; seal. Put packets on sheet pan. Bake 2- to 2-1/2 hours. Check ribs for doneness by gently pulling on bones. When they begin to pull away from meat, they are ready to serve.

MRS. BOB MEYER’S

BARBECUE SAUCE

from 1990 Presbyterian Women First Presbyterian Church

of Apopka

Treasures and Pleasures

1 16-ounce can tomatoes

1/2 cup vinegar

1 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon prepared mustard

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/2 cup ketchup

1 large onion, chopped

1 teaspoon chili powder

Combine all in large pot. Simmer on low heat for 30 minutes, until thick. Let sit at room temperature one hour before serving.

JOHN AND CARLA ALGER’S SOUTHERN FRIED CORN

Recipe from Field to Feast

6 ears fresh corn

4 slices bacon, halved

1/2 cup whole or 2% milk

1 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon pepper

Pinch of sugar

1. Cut corn kernels from cob with a sharp knife. Scrape the back of the knife blade down each cob to get all the milky pulp. Set aside.

2. Fry bacon in a heavy skillet over medium heat until crisp. Remove bacon from skillet, reserving drippings, and drain on paper towel. Crumble bacon and set aside.

3. Add 4 tablespoons reserved bacon grease to same skillet. Add corn, cooking over medium heat without stirring until crisp on one side. Stir in milk, salt, pepper, sugar, and reserved bacon. Cover and cook on low for 10 more minutes. Serve hot.

NEOMA KNOX’S

BROCCOLI AND CAULIFLOWER SALAD,

Recipe from New Vision

Community Church’s

Feeding the Flock

1 bunch cauliflower

1 bunch broccoli

5 strips crisp bacon

1/2 cup medium size red onion

1/2 cup golden raisins

Break and cut broccoli and cauliflower into bite-sized pieces. Broccoli stems may be used if peeled to soft center. (Hint: large pieces are easy to strip.) Break bacon into small pieces. Slice the onion into rings. Mix all the ingredients together.

Dressing:

1 cup mayonnaise

1/2 cup sugar

1 tablespoon cider vinegar

Combine mayonnaise, sugar and vinegar; pour over the salad and mix well. Refrigerate in air-tight container. Chill at least four hours; tip container to spread dressing evenly throughout.

NANCY THOMAS’ COLE SLAW

Contributed by Reader of

The Apopka Chief

1 large head cabbage, washed and drained, quartered

3 large carrots, peeled and grated

1/4 cup Vidalia onion, diced small

3 ribs celery, washed, diced small

2/3 cup salted peanuts, crushed

Granny Smith apple, peeled and chopped small

Slice the cabbage finely with sharp knife and cutting board, then cross-chop. Alternately, you can use food processor. Make sure the cabbage has drained well so the coleslaw isn’t watery. Put peanuts in Ziplok and, on hard surface, chop into small pieces with back of heavy knife. Fold the above ingredients together. Then mix in the dressing (see below). Chill and serve. You can make an hour or two ahead of time to allow the flavors to meld together.

Dressing:

3/4 cup sour cream

3/4 cup mayonnaise

1/4 apple cider vinegar

1/4 apple juice

3/4 cup brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon dry mustard, ground

1/2 teaspoon celery seed

1/2 teaspoon All-purpose seasoning (No-Salt Seasoning works well)

Salt to taste

Pepper to taste

Mix the first four ingredients into soupy mixture. Mix the next six dry ingredients together and blend into dressing. Fold the dressing into the chopped mixture.