Contest-winning, Italian Eggplant Bake sounds like a delightful recipe

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We have a recipe titled The Mayor’s Shrimp and Oyster Pilaf published in Savannah Style, a cookbook given to us by our editor’s mother-in-law. This publication is full of wonderful recipes. This particular recipe calls for burnt butter sauce!

Joy Stokes shared a recipe for Italian Eggplant Bake in Pot Pourri of Zellwood. She made the comment, “This won first place in the Boys Cooking Contest when one of our sons was in high school.”

Corn Pudding (Old Kentucky Recipe) was submitted by Mrs. Louise Sheddan to Stew-Pot Favorites of Zellwood. We thank Claire Ellington for her loan of this delightful little book published by the Woman’s Society of Christian Service, Zellwood Methodist Church, Zellwood, Florida.

It must be pretty old because one of the sponsors/advertisers was The State Bank of Apopka where my husband and I had an account, and another was A. E. Michener who was the Realtor who showed us property that we bought back in 1966.

Applesauce Cake with Broiled Topping from The New York Times New Natural Foods Cookbook looks delicious. We also present the recipes for two versions of their homemade applesauce. The second recipe can also be used for homegrown peaches or pears.

THE MAYOR’S

SHRIMP AND OYSTER PILAF

Recipe from Savannah Style, a Cookbook by The Junior League of Savannah, Inc.

2 cups onion, chopped

1 cup butter

15 ounces canned tomato sauce

16 ounces canned whole tomatoes, mashed

5 cups chicken broth

2 cups rice

1 pound raw shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 pint oysters, drained

Salt and pepper to taste

1. Place onion in 4-quart pot, brown slightly with 1/2 cup butter. Add tomato sauce and whole tomatoes. Let simmer 30 minutes. 2. Add chicken broth, salt and pepper and simmer another 30 minutes. Bring to a boil; add rice, shrimp and oysters. Reduce heat immediately to very low, cover pot and cook 20 minutes without removing lid. Remove lid, stir well and cook 10 minutes at same heat. 3. Place 1/2 cup butter in skillet and burn until BLACK! Pour hot burned butter into pot with shrimp mixture, stir again and serve.

JOY STOKES’

ITALIAN EGGPLANT BAKE

Recipe from POT-POURRI

OF ZELLWOOD,

published by The Zellwood

Community Center

1 medium eggplant, peeled and cut into one-inch cubes

1 large onion, sliced

1 medium green pepper, diced

1/8 teaspoon garlic salt

1 teaspoon oregano

2 tablespoons margarine or butter

1 can condensed tomato soup

1 cup water

1/4 teaspoon salt

Croutons

Parmesan cheese

Cook eggplant in boiling salted water for 3 minutes; drain. Cook onion and green pepper in butter until tender. Put eggplant, onion, and green pepper mixture in shallow baking dish (10 x 6 x 2 inch) and season with garlic salt and oregano. Heat soup and water and pour over eggplant mix. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes. Remove eggplant, top with croutons and Parmesan cheese. Turn oven to 425 degrees and return casserole to oven and bake 15 minutes more.

MRS. LOUISE

SHEDDAN’S CORN PUDDING

(OLD KENTUCKY RECIPE)

Recipe from Stew-Pot
Favorites of Zellwood

1 cup cream-style or frozen corn

1 pint milk

2 eggs

4 tablespoons flour

1-1/2 tablespoons sugar

1 tablespoon butter

1/2 teaspoon salt

Pour mixture in baking dish. Bake at 400 degrees for 30 or 40 minutes. Stir from around sides three or four times while cooking.

APPLESAUCE CAKE WITH BROILED TOPPING

THE NEW YORK TIMES

NEW NATURAL FOODS

COOKBOOK

Copyright 1982 by Jean Hewitt

1-1/2 cups whole wheat flour

2/3 cup unprocessed bran

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg

1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

1/4 teaspoon ground allspice

1 cup raisins

1 cup finely chopped nuts

1/2 cup butter, softened

1 cup brown sugar

2 eggs

1-1/2 cups thick homemade applesauce (see two recipes below)

TOPPING:

1/2 cup butter, melted

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/2 cup milk

1/3 cup unprocessed bran

1/3 cup unsweetened flaked coconut

1/2 cup finely chopped nuts

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. 2. Mix the flour, bran, baking powder, baking soda, salt, spices, raisins, and nuts together. 3. Cream the butter and sugar until well blended. Add the eggs and beat well. Add the dry ingredients alternately with the applesauce, mixing well. 4. Turn into an oiled and lightly floured 9-inch square pan. 5. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in center of cake comes out clean. 6. To make the topping, mix the butter, brown sugar, and milk and boil, stirring for 1 minute. Stir in the bran, coconut, nuts and vanilla. Spread over the hot cake. 7. Put under the broiler for 2 to 3 minutes or until bubbly. 8. Serve the cake warm or cool from pan. Yield: Nine servings.

HOMEMADE APPLESAUCE I

THE NEW YORK TIMES

NEW NATURAL FOODS

COOKBOOK

Copyright 1982 by Jean Hewitt

2 pounds tart cooking apples, washed

1/2 cup boiling water

Honey to taste

Maple syrup to taste

1/4 cup wheat germ

1/2 cup unsulphured raisins

2 tablespoons ground sunflower seed kernels

1/8 teaspoon grated nutmeg

1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon lemon juice or grated lemon rind

1. Do not peel or core the apples. Quarter them and place the quarters in the boiling water. Cook, covered, until barely tender, about 15 minutes. 2. Press the apples through a colander or food mill and add honey and maple syrup. 3. Add remaining ingredients. Yield: Six servings.

HOMEMADE APPLESAUCE II

THE NEW YORK TIMES
NEW NATURAL FOODS
COOKBOOK

Copyright 1982 by Jean Hewitt

8 cups peeled and cored apple slices

2 cups water

2 teaspoons lemon juice

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg

1/4 teaspoon ground allspice

1/4 teaspoon ground mace

Honey to taste

1. Put the apple slices, water, and lemon juice in a 6-quart kettle. 2. Add the remaining ingredients including enough honey to sweeten to taste. Press the apple mixture with a potato masher, leaving some chunks for texture. Alternately, the mixture can be pureed in a food mill, electric blender, or food processor. Yield: Six servings. Note: This same recipe can be used to cook homegrown peaches and pears.